University of Iowa

Speaking and Listening: Comprehension and Collaboration

Mother and child reading together

Caregiver Involvement When Reading Books to Children

By:  
Anna Gibbs, M.Ed.
Chang-Jen Lin, M.Ed.
Deborah K. Reed, Ph.D.

Posted on: April 23, 2019
Children’s literacy development benefits when they discuss four key elements of stories read by their caregivers.

IDEA

The IDEA strategy uses four key components drawn from research that caregivers can easily implement to teach and practice literacy skills when reading to children at home.

PDF iconSet of IDEA bookmarks

Teacher in front of class with book

Student Generation of Higher-Order Questions

By:  
Leah Zimmermann, M.Ed.

Posted on: January 9, 2018
Generating higher-order questions about text benefits students reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. Model this skill for students and provide practice and feedback.

Important Elements of Literary Texts Anchor Chart

Students may use this anchor chart to formulate questions about important elements of literary texts.

PDF iconImportant Elements of Literary Texts

Why is it Important to Ask Good Questions? (Anchor Chart)

This anchor chart provides examples of students’ responses when asked to consider how they will use question generation inside and outside of the classroom.

PDF iconWhy is it Important to Ask Good Questions?

Higher-order Questions Checklist

Students can use this checklist to classify and generate higher-order questions about a text. These types of questions require analyzing or evaluating the text or creating something new.

PDF iconHigher-order Questions Checklist

Parent-Child Conversation: More Than Just Idle Chatter

By:  
Jennifer Knight, Ph.D.

Posted on: July 11, 2017
When parents engage in meaningful oral conversations with children in the home, it can have a positive impact on their vocabulary skills and overall reading ability. Our tips can help foster more of these conversations.

A Synthesis of Peer Mediated Academic Interventions for Secondary Struggling Learners

Deborah K. Reed, Ph.D.

A synthesis of the extant research on peer-mediated reading and math interventions for students in regular or alternative education settings with academic difficulties and disabilities in Grades 6 to 12 (ages 11–18) is presented. Interventions conducted between 2001 and 2012 targeting reading and math were included if they measured effects on at least one academic outcome measure.