University of Iowa

Language: Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

The Contribution of Vocabulary Knowledge and Spelling to the Reading Comprehension of Adolescents Who Are and Are Not English Language Learners

Deborah K. Reed, Ph.D.

This study examined the contributions of vocabulary and spelling to the reading comprehension of students in grades 6–10 who were and were not classified as English language learners. Results indicate that vocabulary accounted for greater between-grade differences and unique variance (ΔR 2 = .11–.31) in comprehension as compared to spelling (ΔR 2 = .01–.09).

RTI for Reading at the Secondary Level: Recommended Literacy Practices and Remaining Questions

Deborah K. Reed, Ph.D.

Grounded in the best current knowledge, this book shows how to implement response to intervention (RTI) in middle and high school contexts. Detailed guidelines are presented for teaching reading comprehension, vocabulary, and other aspects of literacy across the content areas, and for providing effective interventions for students who require additional support.

Bringing Literacy Strategies into Content Instruction: Professional Learning for Secondary-Level Teachers

Deborah K. Reed, Ph.D.

This document provides research-based guidance on academic literacy instruction in the content areas, specifically focusing on the effective use of text in content areas. It reviews the research evidence about content-area literacy instruction for adolescents and suggests ways teachers can use content-area texts to enable students to understand the vocabulary and concepts they contain.

Enhancing Basal Vocabulary Instruction in Kindergarten

Deborah K. Reed, Ph.D.

In order to enhance the basal vocabulary instruction for kindergarten students at risk for reading difficulties, lessons provided in typical curricular materials can be supplemented with instructional elements derived from research.

Adult using dialogic reading with child

Dialogic Reading: Having a Conversation about Books

By:  
Jessica Sidler Folsom, Ph.D.

Posted on: January 3, 2017
When facilitated with various levels of questions, dialogic reading encourages an interactive dialogue about a text being read by an adult to children.